DXC launches Māori and Pacific training and support program

28 November 2022 Consultancy.com.au 3 min. read
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A new initiative by DXC Technology aims to increase opportunities within the IT sector for people of Māori and Pacific backgrounds, as well as build cultural awareness and community engagement.

The New Zealand branch of global professional services firm DXC Technology has launched a new initiative aimed at supporting Māori and Pacific peoples through employment and closer partnerships while fostering greater cultural awareness and community engagement.

DXC Technology hopes its Māori and Pacific Peoples Program strategic framework will attract more members from the community to the IT sector ecosystem.

DXC launches Māori and Pacific training and support program

“This is an exciting initiative for DXC in New Zealand as it gives us an opportunity to demonstrate our ongoing commitment through a meaningful program that will support the Māori and Pacific peoples self-determination and participation in the economy, create education pathways into jobs, boost employment numbers and increase spend in the community,” said DXC Asia Pacific president Seelan Nayagam.

According to the firm, the Māori and Pacific community makes up almost 30 percent of the population, yet accounts for only 7 percent of the local IT sector workforce. Meanwhile, DXC notes that with a handful of large technology transformation programs presently underway in New Zealand there remains an approximate 30 percent shortfall in the number of skilled tech staff required to successfully deliver these projects.

To address the deficit and create new opportunities, the consulting firm will institute a range of skills and training measures in partnership with local development organisations such as TupuToa and Rea, including by increasing the number of IT education and employment pathways available to Māori and Pacific peoples and providing access to vocational support mechanisms. The firm also wishes to enable exposure to technology across all education levels.

In addition to training and job opportunities, DXC’s other primary goal is to support the wider community, such as by evaluating its supply chain to identify potential opportunities to partner with Māori and Pacific businesses. Underpinning its effort will be an investment in training and resources to improve awareness and knowledge of Māori and Pacific culture among DXC staff, along with increased community engagement.

“We look forward to building a business ecosystem that empowers the Māori and Pacific peoples to innovate, establish new ventures and build on existing capabilities and capacity,” stated Nayagam. “By increasing the amount of time spent with Māori and Pacific Peoples, DXC will be building a shared understanding of the value their businesses contribute to the New Zealand market, including their unique perspectives and cultures.”

The launch of DXC’s Māori and Pacific Peoples Program forms a part of the firm’s social impact practice which was established in 2018 in Australia and aims to improve societal outcomes and increase diversity and inclusion through technology and innovation. A recent program to support neurodivergent individuals with skills and job opportunities was successfully piloted in Australia and NZ, and is now being rolled out to various countries worldwide.